Research Workshops

 

Aug 26-28, 2016 – Berkeley, California

Workshop on Machine Learning and AI Safety


This three-day workshop brought together researchers with machine learning backgrounds to work on long-term AI safety problems that can be modeled in current machine learning systems and frameworks, for instance those described in “Concrete Problems in AI Safety” and “Alignment for Advanced Machine Learning Systems”.

Topics included learning human-interpretable and causal models of the environment; engineering cost functions based on impact measures to disincentivize side effects; designing robust metrics for the quality of a purported explanation of a plan; and developing a formal model of Goodhart’s Law which yields mild optimization.

Aug 12-14, 2016 – Berkeley, California

8th Workshop on Logic, Probability, and Reflection


Participants at this workshop — all of them veterans of past workshops — worked on a variety of problems related to MIRI’s Agent Foundations technical agenda, with a focus on decision theory and the formal construction of logical counterfactuals.

June 17, 2016 – Berkeley, California

CSRBAI Workshop on Agent Models and Multi-Agent Dilemmas


Twenty participants attended from institutions including:
  • USC Institute for Creative Technologies
  • Carleton University
  • Future of Humanity Institute
  • Carnegie Mellon University
  • Harvard
  • Oxford University
  • University College London
  • Australian National University
  • UC Berkeley
  • UT Austin
  • Princeton University
  • Columbia University

The Colloquium Series on Robust and Beneficial AI included a series of workshops to facilitate conversations and collaborations between people interested in a number of different approaches to the technical challenges associated with AI robustness and reliability.

The fourth workshop of CSRBAI focused on the topics of designing agents that behave well in their environments, without ignoring the effects of the agent’s own actions on the environment or on other agents within the environment.

June 11-12, 2016 – Berkeley, California

CSRBAI Workshop on Preference Specification


Twenty participants attended from institutions including:
  • Australian National University
  • University College London
  • Center for the Study of Existential Risk
  • University of Oxford
  • Future of Humanity Institute
  • Carnegie Mellon University
  • The Swiss AI Lab IDSIA
  • Australian National University
  • UC Berkeley
  • Brown University
  • University of Montreal
  • USC Institute for Creative Technologies

The Colloquium Series on Robust and Beneficial AI included a series of workshops to facilitate conversations and collaborations between people interested in a number of different approaches to the technical challenges associated with AI robustness and reliability.

The third workshop of CSRBAI focused on the topic of preference specification for highly capable AI systems, in which the perennial problem of wanting code to “do what I mean, not what I said” becomes increasingly challenging.

June 4-5, 2016 – Berkeley, California

CSRBAI Workshop on Robustness and Error-Tolerance


Fourteen participants attended from institutions including:
  • University College London
  • Center for the Study of Existential Risk
  • Google
  • Future of Humanity Institute
  • Carnegie Mellon University
  • Australian National University
  • UC Berkeley
  • The Swiss AI Lab IDSIA
  • Cornell University
  • USC Institute for Creative Technologies

The Colloquium Series on Robust and Beneficial AI included a series of workshops to facilitate conversations and collaborations between people interested in a number of different approaches to the technical challenges associated with AI robustness and reliability.

The second workshop of CSRBAI focused on the topic of robustness and error-tolerance in AI systems, and how to ensure that when AI system fail, they fail gracefully and detectably.

May 28-29, 2016 – Berkeley, California

CSRBAI Workshop on Transparency


Twenty participants attended from institutions including:
  • Oregon State University
  • Australian National University
  • Future of Humanity Institute
  • Carnegie Mellon University
  • IBM Research
  • Montreal Institute for Learning Algorithms
  • Google Research
  • Stanford University
  • Google
  • UC Berkeley
  • University College London
  • Harvard
  • Future of Life Institute

The Colloquium Series on Robust and Beneficial AI included a series of workshops to facilitate conversations and collaborations between people interested in a number of different approaches to the technical challenges associated with AI robustness and reliability.

The first workshop of CSRBAI focused on the topic of transparency in AI systems, and how we can increase transparency while maintaining capabilities.

April 1-3, 2016 – Berkeley, California

Self-Reference, Type Theory, and Formal Verification


Participants worked on questions of self-reference in type theory and automated theorem provers, with the goal of studying systems that model themselves.

August 28-30, 2015 – Berkeley, California

3rd Introductory Workshop on Logical Decision Theory


This was the sixth in a series of introductory workshops, where MIRI brought together researchers with different backgrounds, discussed open problems in one of the technical agenda topics, and began projects and collaborations in that area.

The topic of this workshop was decision theory, and projects begun at the workshop are discussed in the following post: Proof Length and Logical Counterfactuals Revisited

August 7–9, 2015 – Berkeley, California

2nd Introductory Workshop on Logical Uncertainty


This was the fifth in a series of introductory workshops, where MIRI brought together researchers with different backgrounds, discussed open problems in one of the technical agenda topics, and began projects and collaborations in that area.

The topic of this workshop was logical uncertainty, and projects begun at the workshop are discussed in the following post: What’s logical coherence for anyway?

June 26–28, 2015 – Berkeley, California

1st Introductory Workshop on Vingean Reflection


This was the fourth in a series of introductory workshops, where MIRI brought together researchers with different backgrounds, discussed open problems in one of the technical agenda topics, and began projects and collaborations in that area.

The topic of this workshop was Vingean reflection, and projects begun at the workshop are discussed in the following posts:

June 12–14, 2015 – Berkeley, California

2nd Introductory Workshop on Logical Decision Theory


This was the third in a series of introductory workshops, where MIRI brought together researchers with different backgrounds, discussed open problems in one of the technical agenda topics, and began projects and collaborations in that area.

The topic of this workshop was decision theory, and projects begun at the workshop are discussed in the following post: Fixed point theorem in the finite and infinite case

May 29–31, 2015 – Berkeley, California

1st Introductory Workshop on Logical Uncertainty


This was the second in a series of introductory workshops, where MIRI brought together researchers with different backgrounds, discussed open problems in one of the technical agenda topics, and began projects and collaborations in that area.

The topic of this workshop was logical uncertainty, and projects begun at the workshop are discussed in the following posts:

May 4–6, 2015 – Berkeley, California

1st Introductory Workshop on Logical Decision Theory


This was the first in a series of introductory workshops, where MIRI brought together researchers with different backgrounds, discussed open problems in one of the technical agenda topics, and began projects and collaborations in that area.

The topic of this workshop was decision theory, and projects begun at the workshop are discussed in the following posts:

May 3–11, 2014 – Berkeley, CA

7th Workshop on Logic, Probability, and Reflection


Participants at this workshop — all of them veterans of past workshops — worked on a variety of problems related to Friendly AI. The first tech report from this workshop is available here.

December 14–20, 2013 – Berkeley, CA

6th Workshop on Logic, Probability, and Reflection


Participants at this workshop focused on the Löbian obstacle, probabilistic logic, and the intersection of logic and probability more generally. The results of this workshop are described here. See photos from the workshop here.

November 23-29, 2013 – Oxford, UK

5th Workshop on Logic, Probability, and Reflection


Participants at this workshop investigated problems related to reflective agents, probabilistic logic, and priors over logical statements / the logical omniscience problem. Some results from this workshop were developed further at the December 2013 workshop and described here.

September 7-13, 2013 – Berkeley, CA

4th Workshop on Logic, Probability, and Reflection


september_workshop_1_300pxThis workshop focused on a variety of open problems related to normative decision theory. Participants brainstormed “well-posed problems” in the area, built on LaVictoire et al.’s Löbian cooperation work, made some progress on formalizing updateless decision theory, and formulated additional toy problems such as the Ultimate Newcomb’s Problem.

These results are still being written up in various forms.

July 8-14, 2013 – Berkeley, CA

3rd Workshop on Logic, Probability, and Reflection


september_workshop_2_300pxThis workshop focused on a variety of issues related to the Löbian obstacle for self-modifying systems, and to Demski’s earlier work on logical prior probability. The primary result was a proof that attempting to create a probability distribution which performs scientific induction on Π1 statements, converging to probability 1 for the true versions of such statements, can create zero limiting probabilities assigned to true Π2 statements. This result is still being written up, but it has been discussed briefly in a blog post by Demski. Other bits of progress were developed at further workshops and described here.

April 3-24, 2013 – Berkeley, CA

2nd Workshop on Logic, Probability, and Reflection


This three-week workshop addressed multiple open research problems simultaneously. First, participants found an improved version of the reflection principle discovered in the previous workshop, though this progress is still being written up. Second, participants improved upon earlier work by LaVictoire, resulting in the paper “Robust Cooperation in the Prisoner’s Dilemma: Program Equilibrium via Provability Logic.” Third, participants improved upon Benja Fallenstein’s parametric polymorphism approach to tackling the Löbian obstacle for self-modifying systems.

November 11-18, 2012 – Berkeley, CA

1st Workshop on Logic, Probability, and Reflection


This workshop pursued one line of attack on the Löbian obstacle for self-modifying systems. The primary result of this workshop was a non-constructive “loophole” in Tarski’s undefinability of truth (via a fixed point theorem), which was later written up in draft form as “Definability of Truth in Probabilistic Logic” (see discussions here, here, and here).